End of Season Wrap Up

I know I have been MIA for awhile – it has been a really busy year and I have definitely been focusing more on our acreage and less on the computer. We have done so much here this year. So many projects, many having to do with garlic but other stuff too. I’ll fill you in over the next few weeks. I’m just glad that the majority of the outside work is done. Well, the really necessary stuff is! Wait a minute, I just thought of something else that needs to be done.

October and November are some of our favourite months of the year. The garden is finished, the tools have been picked up, the woodroom is full and we are feeling tired but so very content.

If we don’t get much snow, we can still get a lot accomplished outside. And, since the “end of season” work has already been done, these projects are all little “extras”. Who doesn’t like getting a few extras accomplished? I know we do!

 

Fall in the Valley

 

This is how the garden looked in late September. Lots of produce harvested, the garlic not yet planted and kale still going strong! You can see the tall Asparagus on the left; that plot has been in for about 9 years now and we enjoy lots of Asparagus early each spring. The Fall colours are so beautiful here; this picture doesn’t do them justice at all.

Sometimes, early November already sees six inches of snow on the ground. Other times, we don’t see much snow until into December. Time will tell as to when we get the first big dump of snow for 2016.

People who live in the Cariboo (or long time readers of our site) will know that one of the most important things for us to do in mid-October is to pick everything up that is laying around outside. Gardeners, including myself, are notorious for having garden tools scattered everywhere. There are hoses to be taken apart, coiled up and put away in the barn. Garden timers and sprinklers need to be put inside for the winter months. Shovels, rakes, hoes and spades need to be moved from the garden fenceline to a winter storage place under the porch or down at the barn.

We tend to gather things up over a few weeks and if we can’t get them brought down to the barn, we at least leave them on the pathway to the barn. This way if we go down to feed the chickens and are empty handed, we can pick a few things up to bring along with us. It is amazing at how long this process actually takes.

Invariably, we have a lot more tools and equipment just hanging around in the yard than we think we do. T posts and temporary chicken wire fencing need to be taken down or the snow will destroy the fencing.

 

How to provide winter protection for your Greenhouse

 

We tarp over the Greenhouse in an attempt to make it last “just one more year”. This will be a losing battle over the coming winter. We still have the original plastic from 2007 on here! It is now finally falling apart and come Spring we will have to replace it. Want to read about how we built our Greenhouse on the cheap? (That’s an older picture; we have no snow here yet.)

We continue watering any transplanted shrubs and small trees – Fall can be very dry here and it is easy to think that the watering can stop because it is much cooler, but that can often be a fatal mistake.

There are lots of things to be done to wrap up the season and once we get that accomplished, we can sit back and relax a bit. We have always tried to run our farm on a seasonal basis, which means we have very busy Springs and Summers, but much slower Winters. We are able to relax and travel if we want.

 

 

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Campfire Safety

It is the time of year where the weather is cooling off and we are all getting outside more. If you live in an area where there are hiking trails, camping and the many other outdoor activities, you are bound to see campfires and charcoal grills lighting up the trails. It’s a fun and nostalgic time of year, cooking s’mores over the fire, roasting hot dogs, or warming up your cold fingers and toes. But there is a dimmer side to campfires that many people do not think about.

 

The sad truth is that nearly 9 out of 10 wildfires are still caused by humans

 

Although most of us don’t behave this way intentionally, each year we learn of devastating wildfires caused by careless behavior which can impact millions of acres of forest and thousands of homes.

 

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Common ways YOU could unintentionally start a wildfire

  • unattended debris burning
  • equipment fires such as from lawnmowers, ATVs, power equipment
  • smoking
  • unattended campfires
  • fireworks
  • carelessly discarding fireplace or BBQ ashes

 

It is so important to understand the safety and prevention of wildfires. They are damaging not only to the forest but can also be damaging to any homes and structures around them as well. It really isn’t all that difficult to take steps to ensure that you are doing what it takes to prevent a wildfire.

Wildland-urban interface fires tend to be more damaging than urban structural fires, and behave differently from structural fires. The wildland-urban interface is the area where homes and other human development meet or intermingle with undeveloped forests, grasslands, or other natural areas.

People who live in these areas often forget or disregard the wildland fire cycles and dangers. Homes and other structures are built and maintained in a manner that leaves them and their occupants vulnerable. Thus, fire becomes a significant threat to both humans and natural resources.

 

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Smokey Bear’s Campfire Safety Guide

 

How to Pick Your Spot Here are steps for picking your burning site to promote wildfire safety. More

How to Build and/or Prepare Your Campfire Pit Before you start your campfire, you need to prepare and arrange an appropriate pit. More

How to Build Your Campfire If you find a good pit at your campsite, it’s time to safely build your campfire! More

How to Maintain and Extinguish Your Campfire Safety doesn’t end when the fire’s lit. Learn how to safely maintain and put out your campfire here. More

 

How else can you help? Be smart when you go outdoors! Show your commitment to wildfire prevention. Join me in taking the Smokey Bear Pledge!

  • To use caution and common sense before lighting any fire.
  • To understand that any fire I or my friends create could become a wildfire.
  • To understand and practice proper guidelines whenever I or my friends create a fire outdoors.
  • To never, ever leave any fire unattended.
  • To make sure any fire that I or my friends create is properly and completely extinguished before moving on.
  • To properly extinguish and discard of smoking materials.
  • To be aware of my surroundings and be careful when operating equipment during periods of dry or hot weather.
  • To speak up and step in when I see someone in danger of starting a wildfire.

 

 

Want to be sure you’re reading what we’re writing?   Subscribe to our mailing list and don’t miss a single post. Take a look at our sidebar at the top of the page and subscribe. I promise you I’ll keep your email addresses to myself – you won’t ever be spammed and I won’t ever do anything with my list other than let you know every time a new post is published here and give you the inside scoop on great info and deals.

 

 

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