The Mother of All Snow Curls

Want to see the “mother of all” snow curls?   Do you know what a snow curl is? Maybe you know it by another name, but if you live anywhere where there is a lot of snow during Winter, you’re probably familiar with them.

Snow falls and lands on the roof. Maybe the weather warms up and the snow slides off the roof. But if it doesn’t warm up, and instead turns colder, the bottom layer of that snow will turn to ice.

Once it turns to ice, it really has to warm up in order for the snow to melt enough to slide off the roof. When it does warm up, you’ve got the perfect storm brewing.

A storm of snow curls, that is. Some of them hang around for weeks.  Here are just a few of the ones at our Valley homestead.

 

Curl Nov 8

A little baby snow curl begins to grow…

 

 

Snow curl

 

A snow curl in the making. A layer of snow starts to melt in the winter afternoon sun and the snow just starts to slide. Then, it cools down in late afternoon and this happens.

 

 

a snow curl in the making

 

And this….

 

woodroom 2 jan 18 09

A good layer of snow on the roof of the woodroom.

 

woodroom snow curl

 

That layer of snow melts enough to start to curl, but it’s not warm enough to have the snow actually slide off the roof.

 

snow curl

An awesome snow curl hanging off the back of the woodroom.

 

Snow curl

 

Here’s the mother of all snow curls…it surpasses anything we have ever seen in the Valley. This is the snow on the porch side of the house (the side that looks over the garden and pastures.  You can see the lines from the metal roof! Pretty cool, eh?

 

 

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End of Season Wrap Up

I know I have been MIA for awhile – it has been a really busy year and I have definitely been focusing more on our acreage and less on the computer. We have done so much here this year. So many projects, many having to do with garlic but other stuff too. I’ll fill you in over the next few weeks. I’m just glad that the majority of the outside work is done. Well, the really necessary stuff is! Wait a minute, I just thought of something else that needs to be done.

October and November are some of our favourite months of the year. The garden is finished, the tools have been picked up, the woodroom is full and we are feeling tired but so very content.

If we don’t get much snow, we can still get a lot accomplished outside. And, since the “end of season” work has already been done, these projects are all little “extras”. Who doesn’t like getting a few extras accomplished? I know we do!

 

Fall in the Valley

 

This is how the garden looked in late September. Lots of produce harvested, the garlic not yet planted and kale still going strong! You can see the tall Asparagus on the left; that plot has been in for about 9 years now and we enjoy lots of Asparagus early each spring. The Fall colours are so beautiful here; this picture doesn’t do them justice at all.

Sometimes, early November already sees six inches of snow on the ground. Other times, we don’t see much snow until into December. Time will tell as to when we get the first big dump of snow for 2016.

People who live in the Cariboo (or long time readers of our site) will know that one of the most important things for us to do in mid-October is to pick everything up that is laying around outside. Gardeners, including myself, are notorious for having garden tools scattered everywhere. There are hoses to be taken apart, coiled up and put away in the barn. Garden timers and sprinklers need to be put inside for the winter months. Shovels, rakes, hoes and spades need to be moved from the garden fenceline to a winter storage place under the porch or down at the barn.

We tend to gather things up over a few weeks and if we can’t get them brought down to the barn, we at least leave them on the pathway to the barn. This way if we go down to feed the chickens and are empty handed, we can pick a few things up to bring along with us. It is amazing at how long this process actually takes.

Invariably, we have a lot more tools and equipment just hanging around in the yard than we think we do. T posts and temporary chicken wire fencing need to be taken down or the snow will destroy the fencing.

 

How to provide winter protection for your Greenhouse

 

We tarp over the Greenhouse in an attempt to make it last “just one more year”. This will be a losing battle over the coming winter. We still have the original plastic from 2007 on here! It is now finally falling apart and come Spring we will have to replace it. Want to read about how we built our Greenhouse on the cheap? (That’s an older picture; we have no snow here yet.)

We continue watering any transplanted shrubs and small trees – Fall can be very dry here and it is easy to think that the watering can stop because it is much cooler, but that can often be a fatal mistake.

There are lots of things to be done to wrap up the season and once we get that accomplished, we can sit back and relax a bit. We have always tried to run our farm on a seasonal basis, which means we have very busy Springs and Summers, but much slower Winters. We are able to relax and travel if we want.

 

 

Want to be sure you’re reading what we’re writing?   Subscribe to our mailing list and don’t miss a single post. Take a look at our sidebar at the top of the page and subscribe. I promise you I’ll keep your email addresses to myself – you won’t ever be spammed and I won’t ever do anything with my list other than let you know every time a new post is published here and give you the inside scoop on great info and deals.